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Chicago Bail Hearing Attorney

Are you or your loved one in jail and awaiting trial?  Depending on the alleged offense, the Law Office of William Carlos Weeden in Chicago, Illinois may be able to get your bail amount reduced to a more reasonable amount or have you released without posting bail.

The court can also require that you or your loved one do additional things. If the person released on bail breaks any of these rules, their bond will be revoked and they  will be taken to jail.

If you want your loved one out of the  jail now, call our office.  We will be happy to speak to you about getting a reasonable bond set and representing your loved one.

Bail

The words “bail” and “bond” are often used almost interchangeably when discussing jail release, and while they are closely related to each other, they are not the same thing. Bail is the money you or your loved one must pay in order to get out of jail. A bond is posted on behalf of you or your loved one to secure his or her release.  In order to obtain this bail, you or your loved one must either pay a percentage of the bail up front, usually ten percent, or provide some form of collateral, like real estate.  Once you or your loved one appears for all of the required court dates, the bail deposit is returned or the property lien is removed.

Bail Amount and Restrictions

A judge determines the amount of bail based on factors like the severity of the alleged offense, the likelihood that the defendant will commit additional crimes after being released, and the chances that the defendant will flee the jurisdiction before trial. A judge may set bail at any amount that is not objectively unreasonable or arbitrarily  deny bail altogether. The Eighth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution prohibits “excessive bail” but does not state that courts are required to allow bail.

In general, bail is based upon the severity of the alleged offense, the accused’s criminal history (prior arrests) and their ties to the community.

If you or your loved one post a bail amount to secure your release, you must:

  • Come to all court dates;
  • Obey all  court orders;
  • Stay in Illinois, unless given permission from the court to leave the state; and
  • Not commit any other crimes.

You or your loved one may also have to:

  • Avoid contact with the alleged victim or complaining witness (this also applies to all locations of a retail chain if you’re charged with retail theft).
  • Give up any guns you have; and
  • Go through a psychological evaluation.

The court can also require that you or your loved one do additional things. If the person released on bail breaks any of these rules, their bond will be revoked and they  will be taken to jail.

If you want your loved one out of the  jail now, call our office.  We will be happy to speak to you about getting a reasonable bond set and representing your loved one.

Bail Classifications

In Illinois and Cook County, the courts have three main kinds of bonds:

  • I-Bond or Individual Bond: Allows the defendant to be free on “own recognizance,” meaning they are pledging to obey court orders and show up without having to pay any money. The dollar amount which is set with issuance of an I-Bond becomes a judgement and can be collected by the court should the defendant fail to appear or comply with any to the conditions of release.
  • D-Bond or Demand Bond: In Illinois, the defendant pays 10% of the bail to the clerk and a document called a “bail bond” is executed indicating the amount of money posted, the non-monetary conditions of bail, whether it was posted by a person other than the defendant, notice that the money may be used to pay costs, attorney’s fees, fines or other purposes authorized by the court and that it is subject to forfeiture should the defendant fail to comply with the conditions of bail. In some states, a person goes to a bail bonds agency and the agency then pays the full bail to the court and becomes responsible for the person showing up. 
  • C-Bond or Cash Bond: For certain class X drug charges or charges of making or attempting to make a terrorist threat, the entire bail amount must be paid before the defendant can be released from custody. 

In addition, bond assignments are allowed in Cook County, Illinois which means that your money can do double duty. It can keep your loved one out of jail prior to trial and it can be used to pay attorney’s fees. Contact our Chicago, Illinois criminal defense lawyers today  to see if bond can be set now. We are available 24 hours a day and seven days a week.

Chicago Bail Hearing Attorney

Chicago Criminal Defense Lawyer William Carlos Weeden will work to protect your rights throughout the entire criminal process from bail hearing through potential trial, all with compassion and understanding.  Whether the goal is to challenge police procedure, negotiate a fair plea deal for the case, or to fight the charges at trial, Chicago Criminal Defense Attorney William Carlos Weeden is with you every step of the way. Contact our office at (773) 683-1060, to see how an Illinois Criminal Defense lawyer can help protect your freedom.

 

Call us: 773.683.1060 Criminal Matters 24hrs/7days

Law Office of William Carlos Weeden

The information on this website has been provided for general informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice nor create an attorney-client relationship or warrant that a certain result will be attained in a specific case. The Supreme Court of Illinois does not recognize certifications of specialties in the practice of law and the certificate, award or recognition is not a requirement to practice law in Illinois. We encourage you to contact us or another legal professional for advice regarding your individual situation.

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