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Chicago Suspended/Revoked License Attorney

If you have been charged with Driving on a Suspended License or Driving on a Revoked License, you face serious criminal charges in addition to a longer period of suspension. In order to understand your rights and learn about the potential penalties and defenses, contact the Law Office of Willliam Carlos Weeden for a confidential initial consultation at no cost.

Penalties for Driving on a Suspended or Driving on a Revoked License

The penalties for Driving on a Suspended or Revoked License vary greatly depending on why you are suspended or revoked and how many prior convictions you may have. The first factor regarding Driving on a Suspended License and Driving on a Revoked License penalties is why your driver’s license was suspended or revoked. If your suspension or revocation is based upon a prior Driving Under the Influence (DUI) conviction, the penalties are more harsh than if your suspension or revocation was for unpaid traffic tickets or unpaid child support.

On the low end, Driving on a Suspended License is a Class A misdemeanor offense punishable by up to 365 days in jail and a $2,500 fine. However, if you have prior Driving on Revoked Convictions you could be charged with up to a Class X felony punishable by 6 – 30 years in the Department of Corrections.

Reasons for Suspension or Revocation 

Your license may be suspended or revoked for a range of reasons in Illinois, such as if you: 

  • have been convicted of three or more traffic offenses within 12 months 
  • are repeatedly involved in motor vehicle collisions 
  • cause an accident that results in injury or death 
  • drive with a suspended or revoked license 
  • are convicted of fleeing a police officer 
  • are convicted of certain offenses that occurred while you were in control of a vehicle, including certain sex crimes and drug offenses. 

In addition, license revocation is mandatory for certain offenses, including: 

  • reckless homicide if a vehicle was used in the offense 
  • driving under the influence of alcohol 
  • commission of a felony if a vehicle was used 
  • leaving the scene of an accident involving death or injury

Your license may be suspended if you fail to pay a certain number of parking tickets or traffic violations, or fail to pay or evade a certain number of tolls. 

A license may also be suspended for reasons unrelated to driving, such as if you are delinquent in child support. Your license may be suspended or revoked for many other reasons. 

Reinstating Your License 

The period of time your license is suspended or revoked may vary. When the period of revocation or suspension has ended, a reinstatement fee is required to regain your license. The fee will depend in part on the reason that your license was suspended or revoked, and may range from $70 to $500.  

You may have to meet other conditions or pay other fees before you regain your driver’s license. 

Charges for Driving After Suspension or Revocation 

Driving while your license is suspended or revoked is a crime. You may be charged with a petty offense, a Class A misdemeanor, or a felony, depending on the circumstances of your charge. Your charge may be more serious if you have previous convictions for driving after suspension or revocation, or if your license was suspended or revoked for certain reasons. 

In many situations, you may be charged with a Class A misdemeanor. The maximum penalties for a Class A misdemeanor may include a $2,500 fine, and 
up to a year in jail. 

  • Under certain conditions, you may be charged with a petty offense, which is a less serious charge than a misdemeanor or felony.  It carries a maximum $500 fine.  
  • Under other conditions, you may be charged with a felony. Examples of reasons for felony charges for driving after suspension or revocation include a specified number previous convictions and driving while your license is revoked due to a conviction relating to reckless homicide. 

Fines for felony convictions may be up to $25,000.  Possible prison sentences for a felony in Illinois may depend on the class of felony. Your sentence may be in one of the following ranges: 

  • for a Class 1 felony, between four years and 15 years 
  • for a Class 2 felony, between three years and seven years 
  • for a Class 3 felony, between two years and five years, and 
  • for a Class 4 felony, between one year and three years. 

In general, sentences may not indicate the amount of time you are required to actually serve in jail or prison. Instead, they may reflect a sentence that will be suspended while you are on probation. 

Minimum Sentences 

In some situations, you may face a minimum sentence. For example, if you are convicted of driving after suspension or revocation, and the reason for the loss of your license was a reckless homicide conviction, you may face a minimum sentence of 30 days in jail or 300 hours of community service.

If your license is suspended or revoked for certain other violations, including driving under the influence, you may face a minimum sentence of 10 days in jail or 30 days of community service.  

In certain other situations, you may incur a 180-day minimum sentence.  

Chicago Suspended and Revoked License Lawyer

If you are charged with driving after suspension or revocation in Illinois, you should consider hiring an attorney. A conviction could result in steep fines or jail time.  In addition, your  ability to keep employment, retain insurance, or go to school, could also be adversely affected. 

Attorney William Carlos Weeden is a former prosecutors who understand how the traffic laws work. Ideally, the best resolution to your case is for your driver’s license to be reinstated by the Illinois Secretary of State. However, that is not always possible. Attorney Weeden will explore all avenues of Driving on a Revoked or Suspended License including whether there was probable cause to stop the vehicle and whether the prosecutor can prove you were driving.

Chicago Suspended and Revoked License Attorney William Carlos Weeden will work to protect your rights throughout the entire criminal process with compassion and understanding.  Whether the goal is to challenge police procedure, negotiate a fair plea deal for the case, or to fight the charges at trial, Chicago Criminal Defense Attorney William Carlos Weeden is with you every step of the way. Contact our office at (773) 683-1060, to see how an Illinois Criminal Defense lawyer can help protect your freedom.

Law Office of William Carlos Weeden

The information on this website has been provided for general informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice nor create an attorney-client relationship or warrant that a certain result will be attained in a specific case. The Supreme Court of Illinois does not recognize certifications of specialties in the practice of law and the certificate, award or recognition is not a requirement to practice law in Illinois. We encourage you to contact us or another legal professional for advice regarding your individual situation.

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